Quick Answer: Is Malaysia a biodiversity hotspot?

Malaysia is part of the Sundaland Biodiversity Hotspot and is ranked 12 globally in terms of its National Biodiversity Index. Malaysia boasts a wealth of biodiversity which includes 306 species of mammals, 742 species of birds, 567 species of reptiles and over 15,000 plant species.

Why is biodiversity high in Malaysia?

The large number of species is due to the wet tropical climate, favourable conditions for the growth and evolution of plants and animals, as well as the presence of great diversity of habitats in Malaysia. These habitats include the seas, rivers, forests and mountains.

Is Malaysia a mega biodiversity country?

Malaysia is one of the world’s megadiverse countries. It is also ranked 12th in the world, according to the National Biodiversity Index, which is based on estimates of country richness and endemism in four terrestrial vertebrate classes and vascular plants.

Which country is a biodiversity hotspot?

Brazil. It is the country with the greatest biodiversity of flora and fauna on the planet. Brazil has the highest number of species of known mammals and freshwater fish, and more than 50,000 species of trees and bushes, it takes first place in plant diversity.

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What makes Malaysia a mega biodiversity country?

Malaysia is one of the most mega diverse countries in the world. It ranks 12th globally, with more than 15,000 species of vascular plants and 152,000 species of animal life. As such, Malaysia’s right over its own rich biodiversity must be protected at all costs.

Which country has the best biodiversity?

Brazil is the Earth’s biodiversity champion. Between the Amazon rainforest and Mata Atlantica forest, the woody savanna-like cerrado, the massive inland swamp known as the Pantanal, and a range of other terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, Brazil leads the world in plant and amphibian species counts.

What is the natural vegetation of Malaysia?

The characteristic vegetation of Malaysia is dense evergreen rainforest. Rainforest still covers more than two-fifths of the peninsula and some two-thirds of Sarawak and Sabah; another fraction of the country is under swamp forest. … The flora of the Malaysian rainforest is among the richest in the world.

What is Philippine biodiversity?

The Philippines is one of the 17 mega biodiverse countries, containing two-thirds of the Earth’s biodiversity and 70 percent of world’s plants and animal species due to its geographical isolation, diverse habitats and high rates of endemism. The Philippines’ biodiversity provides several ecosystem services.

What are the 12 mega biodiversity countries?

Aside from the WCMC, in 2002 a total of 12 of the main developing countries considered mega-diverse gathered in Mexico: Brazil, China, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Peru, South Africa and Venezuela.

What defines a biodiversity hotspot?

To be classified as a biodiversity hotspot, a region must have lost at least 70 percent of its original natural vegetation, usually due to human activity. There are over 30 recognized biodiversity hotspots in the world. The Andes Mountains Tropical Hotspot is the world’s most diverse hotspot.

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Which country has the lowest biodiversity?

This is causing species around the planet to decline at a concerning speed. A new analysis looking into how much biodiversity is left in different countries around the world has shown that the UK has some of the lowest amounts of biodiversity remaining.

Is the biodiversity hotspot region?

A biodiversity hotspot is a biogeographic region with significant levels of biodiversity that is threatened by human habitation. … Some of these hotspots support up to 15,000 endemic plant species and some have lost up to 95% of their natural habitat.

Which country supports almost 10 of biodiversity on the earth?

South Africa. One of the most diverse countries in the world. It contains nearly 10% of all known species of birds, fish and plants registered in the world and 6% of mammal and reptile species.