Which one of the following is environmental impact assessment process?

What is environmental impact assessment process?

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process of evaluating the likely environmental impacts of a proposed project or development, taking into account inter-related socio-economic, cultural and human-health impacts, both beneficial and adverse.

What are the methods of environmental impact assessment?

The main EIA techniques used in scoping are baseline studies, checklists, matrices and network diagrams. These techniques collect and present knowledge and information in a straightforward way so that logical decisions can be made about which impacts are most significant.

What are the steps in EIA process?

EIA: 7 Steps

  1. Scoping. Establish the boundaries of the EIA, set the basis of the analyses that will be conducted at each stage, describe the project alternatives and consult the affected public. …
  2. Impact Assessment & Mitigation. …
  3. Impact Management. …
  4. The EIA Report. …
  5. Review & Licensing. …
  6. Monitoring.

What are the four stages in EIA process?

Stages of the EIA process

  • Screening. Deciding if an EIA is required.
  • Scoping. Deciding what needs to be covered in the assessment and reported in the ‘EIA Report’
  • Preparing the EIA Report. …
  • Making an application and consultation. …
  • Decision making. …
  • Post decision.
IT IS SURPRISING:  What are the benefits of attracting wildlife into your garden?

What is an environmental assessment?

Environmental assessment (EA) is the assessment of the environmental consequences of a plan, policy, program, or actual projects prior to the decision to move forward with the proposed action. … It is a tool of environmental management forming a part of project approval and decision-making.

What is the need for environmental impact assessment?

i) To disclose significant environmental effects of proposed projects to decision-makers and the public. ii) To identify ways to avoid or reduce environmental damage. iii) To prevent adverse environmental impacts by requiring implementation of feasible alternatives or mitigation measures.

What are the various impact assessment methods give examples?

Key types of impact assessments include global assessments (global level), policy impact assessment (policy level), strategic environmental assessment (programme and plan level), and environmental impact assessment (project level).

What are the 5 steps that a correct environmental impact assessment EIA must include?

Key stages in the Environmental Assessment process include: screening, alternatives, preliminary assessment, scoping, mitigation, main EIA study and environmental impact statement, review and monitoring (Box 5.1 and Figure 5.1).

What is environmental impact assessment in South Africa?

The EIA is South Africa’s key regulatory instrument to mitigate and/or manage the impacts of new developments and activities that are considered to potentially impact on the right to an environment that is not harmful to health and well-being.

How many stages are there in environmental impact assessment?

7 Stages of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)

Which of the following phases are involved in environmental impact assessment process in India?

Notes: The phases involved in Environment Impact Assessment process in India are as follows: Screening, Scoping, Baseline data collection, Impact prediction, Assessment of alternatives, delineation of mitigation measures and environmental impact statement, Public hearing, Environment Management Plan, Decision making …

IT IS SURPRISING:  What happens to landfills in India?

What is environmental impact assessment in Nigeria?

It is an instrument by which we identify and assess the potential environmental, social and health impacts of a proposed project, evaluate alternatives, and design appropriate environmental and social management plans during the life-cycle of the project.

Which is first step in EIA?

Screening is the first stage of the EIA process which results in a key EIA decision, namely to either conduct the assessment (based on the likely significant impacts) or not conduct it (in the anticipated absence of such impacts).