the Farmer’s Market

Check out the new Farmers Market in the Oak Beach Parking lot this Saturday!

Local venders offering quality organic and home grown produce and things.

Stop on by Saturday June 30th!

Beach Update 6/26 – Looks can be Deceiving

Walked today at low tide, looks like some sand came back, but not enough to add to the high tide beach, but look better than the 6/17 low tide pictures. Better later than never, think this is the first plus sign of sand to occur this year.

Even with the positive development, more erosion to the base and depth of the sand dunes has occurred since the last report on 6/19.

Couple more of the remaining fence posts toppled over the weekend, just west of Coast Guard
Coast Guard Station substructure on June 26th, 2017, notice the loss of sand under the old foundation
Beach sand returning looking east towards Hemlock Cove from Coast Guard at Gilgo State Park

Looks can be deceiving, wishing it was beach back, look at the high water debris line, still getting to the dune base in many locations.

The South Shore Barrier Beaches need sand, call your Congressman today.

 

Poison Ivy Explosion on the Barrier Beaches

With the warm winter we just had, besides the tick alert, be very mindful of where you are walking on all of the Fire Island Beaches. Poison Ivy is popping up everywhere.

Here is a link to more information about poison ivy

Mature summer leaves with new growth out front.

All of the plant will give you a rash, not just the leaves, the Bark is loaded with the same plant oil called urushiol that coats the leaves. It is extremely stable and will stay active for many years in the right conditions.

Remember that when you take off your gloves, cloths, etc.

If you think you have come in contact with Poison Ivy, you have 20 to 30 minutes to get the oil off your skin to avoid the evil rash.

Best to use cold water, lots of it and then some soap. Or jump in the ocean or bay asap. Do not use warm /hot water as it opens the skin’s pores and provides a path for the oil to get inside of you.

Keep an eye out for this plant!

 

BE ON THE LOOKOUT, its TERRAPIN TIME!

BE ON THE LOOKOUT, its TERRAPIN TIME!

Turtle egg laying for next 30 days.

Look out on Ocean Parkway for Turtles Crossing the Parkway. They are in search of sand to dig an area to bury their Eggs. Watch both Ways for next 30 Days on the Parkway, the turtles attempt to get to the ocean and then go back to the bay.

Order of Chaeadriiformes

Gulls are from the order Chaeadriiformes and the family Laridae, as are terns. Gulls, unlike terns, comprise the subfamily Larinae.

All gulls are sturdy looking with long pointed wings and an almost square tail. Their feet are webbed and their bills are hooked. When landing in the water to grab food, they alight almost gently rather than dive.

Generally their flight is strong with deliberate wing-beats but some gulls also soar. Opportunists, gulls are mostly scavengers and are at home around human gatherings where they can expect to seize the garbage and refuse left behind by people.

Most adult gulls are some combination of white, grey and black. The markings of gulls are the same in the female and male. Immature gulls have different markings and some gulls may not have their adult plumage for several years. Gulls nest in colonies and generally produce 2 to 5 eggs each year.

The Herring Gull, Larus argentatus, is the most common species found in the United States. Early European colonists on our shores found the herring and great black backed gulls so common and people friendly that they could be easily killed for food.