the Farmer’s Market

Check out the new Farmers Market in the Oak Beach Parking lot this Saturday!

Local venders offering quality organic and home grown produce and things.

Stop on by Saturday June 30th!

A Look Back – Coast Guard Station Post Sandy

Found pictures of the Gilgo Beach area and the Coast Guard Station after Hurricane Sandy passed. That is the Garbage Cove, Great South Bay in the background of slide 3, dunes gone, Ocean Parkway buckled.

There looks to be more or the same amount of beach after Sandy than there is at the beach now! Call your Congressman, tell him we need Sand.

Below are photos of the Coast Guard Station today!

Here is a photo of bulkhead after Sandy and below it, at the present time.

Coast Guard Bulkhead after Hurricane Sandy
Coast Guard Bulkhead at present. Picture taken June 18th, 2017

Coast Guard Station Exposed Now in 2017

The old Coast Guard station located on the east side of Gilgo Beach Town Park and the entrance to Gilgo State Park is exposed more than it has been in the 20 years I have been coming here. Here is a link to more information about the Gilgo Coast Guard Station.

In the photo below, see the double bulkhead, a new one had been placed in front of the original, a lot of years passed for this picture to be taken.

Check out the original bulkhead that has popped out of the sand.
W of CG, the fence is caving here, it is gone on many of the dunes
Ocean water edge, Rebar from the old Coast Guard smashed and exposed. Look at the dunes in the background with their walls caving in from high tide wave action.

This area has suffered much more erosion that before the Super Storm Sandy event. This is a dangerous sign of how weak our beaches are to stand up to a hurricane this fall.

Click here for a Video of the Coast Guard Station on 7/6/17

Please Contact your government officials, here is the current list,
Urge them to fund a Beach Replenishment Project this Fall.

MIT Seagrant Experience

Down on the beaches we are intimately familiar with the oceans and the increasing impact they have on our lives. The challenges of operating in the ocean have always pushed the related technologies to the forefront of their fields. This is still true today in our world and I got a front row seat for some of these developments during my two week stay at MIT’s Seagrant College as part of the OEX (Ocean Engineering Experience) program.  Sixteen students from across the United States were selected to participate in the program, and I was one of them.

The program had a two-pronged approach.  Professionals ranging from marine scientists to mechanical engineers lectured us.  This was complimented by a hands-on team project where, under a tight deadline, we conceived, constructed, and tested an ROV designed to log temperature and depth in the adjacent Charles River.  We drew our designs from historic ROV’s such as the Jason Jr., explorer of the Titanic, as well as some cutting edge vehicles, some web connected, in the Seagrant lab.

Seagrant is a partnership between NOAA and 32 universities around the country.  The goal is to support research, training and outreach programs such as OEX. The experience opened my eyes to the wealth of opportunities in the field of Ocean Engineering and reaffirmed the importance of stewardship of the oceans.

By Jed Dale, Student Editor