Why climate change is an important issue and how it should be addressed?

Climate change is breeding storms with heavier rainfall, flooding farms — such as this one, which grows cotton. A warmer world — even by a half-degree Celsius — has more evaporation, leading to more water in the atmosphere. Such changing conditions put our agriculture, health, water supply and more at risk.

Why is climate change an important issue that needs to be addressed?

This means that climate change causes less predictable weather patterns and increases the number of natural disasters that occur worldwide, such as hurricanes and wildfires. …

How should climate change addressed?

Mitigation – reducing climate change – involves reducing the flow of heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, either by reducing sources of these gases (for example, the burning of fossil fuels for electricity, heat or transport) or enhancing the “sinks” that accumulate and store these gases (such as the …

Why is climate change important?

It’s important that we understand how the climate is changing, so that we can prepare for the future. Studying the climate helps us predict how much rain the next winter might bring, or how far sea levels will rise due to warmer sea temperatures.

Why is climate Action important?

Doing nothing will end up costing us a lot more than if we take actions now that will lead to more jobs, greater prosperity, and better lives for all while reducing green- house gas emissions and building climate resilience.

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How do we affect climate change?

Humans are increasingly influencing the climate and the earth’s temperature by burning fossil fuels, cutting down forests and farming livestock. This adds enormous amounts of greenhouse gases to those naturally occurring in the atmosphere, increasing the greenhouse effect and global warming.

When did climate change become an issue?

June 23, 1988 marked the date on which climate change became a national issue. In landmark testimony before the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Dr.